Senate Democrats

Having Vetoed CHIP, President Sets His Sights on Vetoing Medical Research

Coming on the heals of his veto of the bi-partisan Children’s Health Insurance measure, President Bush has now set his sights on vetoing funding for the nation’s medical research institutions. Last week, the President issued a veto threat to the measure which provides funds for the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services and Education. Below are highlights of the medical and public health research initiatives funded by the Senate Labor-Health and Human Services measure, which are threatened by the President’s veto.

The Senate Labor-Health and Human Services Bill Provides Much Needed Funding for the National Institutes of Health. The measure provides $1 billion more for the NIH compared to last year and almost $1.3 billion more than President Bush’s FY 2008 Budget request.  The President’s budget in fact, called for cutting NIH funding by $279 million. The National Institutes of Health is one of the world’s most influential biomedical research facilities. Within the NIH, numerous institutes were created to conducted life saving research into a wide range of disorders and diseases. The Senate bill funds some of these institutes as follows:

  • $4.91 billion for the National Cancer Institute, which is $128 million more than the Administration’s request.
  • $2.99 billion for the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, which is $67 million more than the Administration’s request.
  • $1.75 billion for the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, which is $40 million more than the Administration’s request.
  • $1.57 billion for the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, which is $36 million more than the Administration’s request.
  • $4.37 billion for the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, which is $76 million more than the Administration’s request.
  • $1.44 billion for the National Institute of Mental Health, which is $31 million more than the Administration’s request. [Democratic Policy Committee, S. 1710, the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education and Related Agencies Appropriations Bill Summary, 2008; CQ Senate Report 110-107 – To accompany S. 1710, 6/27/07]

The Senate Labor-Health and Human Services Measure Increases Funding for the Centers for Disease Control. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention is the nation’s premiere health promotion, prevention, and preparedness agency as well as a global leader in public health. The CDC remains at the forefront of public health efforts to prevent and control infectious and chronic diseases, injuries, workplace hazards, disabilities, and environmental health threats. The Senate measure provides $6.43 billion for the CDC’s research efforts, $444 million more than the Administration’s request. Within the CDC, a number of research initiatives in public health are funded by the Labor-Health and Human Services Measure. Funding levels for some of the research programs include:

  • $272.4 million for occupational safety and health programs, which is $19 million more than the Administration’s request.
  • $16.5 million for the CDC’s efforts in Autism, which is $1.4 million over the FY 2007 funding level.
  • $1.63 billion for CDC efforts in terrorism preparedness, which is $128 million more than the Administration’s request.
  • $296.34 million for CDC’s efforts in environmental health and injury prevention, which is $8.7 million more than the Administration’s request. [Democratic Policy Committee, S. 1710, the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education and Related Agencies Appropriations Bill Summary, 2008; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Present and Future]
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