Senate Democrats

H.R. 1105: the Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009

A pdf of this report is available here.

Summary

The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 (H.R.1105) is an appropriations bill that contains the nine Fiscal Year 2009 appropriations bills not completed in the 110th Congress.  Last year, President Bush did not work with Congress to come up with a compromise to finish these bills that make investments in our nation’s energy, health care, education, environment, law enforcement, and diplomatic and global health initiatives.

If enacted, this bill would make fiscally-responsible investments that reflect the priorities of America’s families with funding for Agriculture; Commerce, Justice, Science;Energy and Water Development;Financial Services;Interior and the Environment;Labor, Health and Education;Legislative Branch;State and Foreign Operations;andTransportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Homeland Security

The legislation carefully balances the need to make critical investments in our nation’s future while ensuring strict accountability measures to ensure American tax dollars are spent wisely and cutting and eliminating programs that haven’t performed the way they should.  The Congressionally-directed spending, or “earmarks,” in the legislation are reduced by five percent below last year’s levels, building on last year’S.43 percent reduction.

The Senate is expected to consider H.R.1105 the week of March 2, 2009. 

Major Provisions

Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies

Division A of the Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would provide funding for agricultural, conservation, rural development, food and nutrition assistance, and food safety programs as well as the Food and Drug Administration.  In total, Division A would appropriate $20.5 billion which is $2.5 billion more than was appropriated for the Fiscal Year 2008 and $1.9 billion more than President Bush’s Fiscal Year 2009 budget request. Major provisions of Division A include:

Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.  The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would provide $881 million for the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service which is $14 million more than was appropriated for Fiscal Year 2008.  This program protects the health and value of American agriculture and natural resources by working to protect the nation’s animal and plant resources from agricultural pests and diseases.

Food Safety and Inspection Service.  The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would provide $971.5 million for the Food Safety and Inspection Service which is $41.4 million more than was appropriated for Fiscal Year 2008.  This program is the public health agency in the Department of Agriculture responsible for ensuring that the nation’s commercial supply of meat, poultry, and egg products are safe.

Federal Crop Insurance Corporation Fund.  The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would provide $6.58 billion for the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation Fund which is $1.76 billion more than was appropriated for Fiscal Year 2008.  The Federal Crop Insurance Corporation Fund is responsible for managing the federal crop insurance program.

Natural Resources Conservation Service.  The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would provide $968.4 million ($853 million for conservation, $24.2 for watershed and flood prevention operations, $40 million for watershed rehabilitation, and $50.7 million for resource conservation) for the National Resources Conservation Service which is $31.6 million more than was appropriated for Fiscal Year 2008.  The National Resources Conservation Service provides funding for conservation activities like erosion control, enhancing wildlife habitat, and water conservation.  The National Resources Conservation Service is required to submit reports to Congress on its weaknesses and deficiencies in its financial management.

Rural Housing Service.  The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would provide $1.753 billion in appropriations that would leverage $8.12 billion in loans for the Rural Housing Service program which is $2.03 billion more than was available for Fiscal Year 2008.  The Rural Housing Service program provides funding that supports homeownership, rent assistance, housing repair, and essential community facility construction.

Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program.  The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would provide $53.9 billion for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program which is $14.2 billion more than was appropriated in Fiscal Year 2008.  The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (Food Stamps) provides funding to low-income individuals and households to purchase food.

Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC).  The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would provide $6.86 billion for the WIC program which is $840 million more (emergency and non-emergency) than was appropriated in Fiscal Year 2008.  The WIC program gives grant funding to states to support healthy nutrition options for mothers and their children and infants.

International Food Aid.  The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would provide $1.2 billion for international food aid (Public Law 480) which is $15 million than was appropriated in Fiscal Year 2008.  The funding provided for Public Law 48o is used to combat world hunger and malnutrition by providing U.S. agricultural commodities to developing countries.

Food and Drug Administration.  The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would provide $2.05 billion to the Food and Drug Administration which is $334.6 million more than was appropriated in Fiscal Year 2008.  The Food and Drug Administration is responsible for the safety of, among other products, the nation’s food, drugs, and medical devices.

Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies

Division B of the Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 (H.R.1105) would strengthen the economy and promote American competitiveness, protect our nation from terrorism and violent crime, and promote scientific advancements by providing $57.7 billion in funding for the Department of Commerce (including the National Institute of Standards and Technology Research (NIST)), Department of Justice (including the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)), and Science related agencies (including the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)) for Fiscal Year 2009.  This is $3.6 billion above the previous Administration’s request and $5.9 billion over Fiscal Year 2008 funding levels.  Major provisions of Division B include:

Commerce

H.R.1105 would fund:

International Trade Administration (ITA). H.R.1105 would provide $420 million for ITA, which will help the United States enforce trade laws and improve American competitiveness.

Economic Development Administration. H.R.1105 would provide $240 million to attract private investment to create jobs and help communities address economic challenges through innovation, including “green” practices, and competiveness. $15.8 million of this funding would be provided for Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) program.

Minority Business Development Agency. H.R.1105 would provide $30 million for this agency to foster, promote, and develop minority-owned businesses.

Bureau of the Census. H.R.1105 would provide $3.1 billion, $1.7 billion above the 2008 funding level, to prepare for the 2010 census.

United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). H.R.1105 would provide $2 billion for the patent office. The bill also includes policy provisions on the growing backlog of patent applications and directs the USPTO to take actions to reduce duplication of work already being performed by another patent office without compromising the sovereignty of the United States.

National Institute of Standards and Technology. H.R.1105 would provide $819 million, $63.1 million above the 2008 funding level, to promote American innovation and economic competitiveness by improving scientific measurements, standards, and technology. Included in this appropriation is $110 million for Manufacturing Extension Partnerships, which help small and mid-size manufactures to compete globally, and $65 million for the Technology Innovation Program, which provides high-risk, high-reward research in areas of critical national need.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.  H.R.1105 would appropriate $4.37 billion to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration which is $376 million more than was appropriated in Fiscal Year 2008.  The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is responsible for understanding and predicting changes in the Earth’s environment and managing the nation’s coastal and marine resources.

Justice

H.R.1105 would fund:

State and Local Law Enforcement and Crime Prevention Grants.H.R.1105 would provide $3.2 billion for state and local law enforcement and crime prevention grants, including the Community Organized Policing Services (COPS), which gives police departments across the country the technology and training tools needed to prevent, detect, and stop traditional street crime.  This appropriation is $495 million above the 2008 funding levels and takes further steps to restore the more than $2 billion in cuts made to state and local law enforcement programs since 2001, during the Bush Administration. 

·         COPS.  H.R.1105 would provide $550 million, including initiatives to fight methamphetamine-related crime ($39 million).

·         Office on Violence Against Women. H.R.1105 would provide $415 million, $15 million above the 2008 funding level, to prevent and prosecute violent crimes against women and better help victims of domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking.

·         Office of Justice Programs. H.R.1105 would provide $2 billion, $321 million above the 2008 funding level, for Byrne Justice Assistance Grants ($546 million), the State Criminal Alien Assistance Program ($400 million), drug courts ($40 million), juvenile justice ($374 million), and programs for at risk youth and missing or abused children ($70 million). 

FBI.  H.R.1105 would provide $7.3 billion for the FBI, $537 million above the 2008 funding level.  The appropriation includes $3.8 billion for national security activities, such as the hiring of 280 new agents and 271 new intelligence analysts, and $3.3 billion for criminal investigations, including mortgage fraud. 

United States Marshals Service (USMS).  H.R.1105 would provide $954 million for USMS to provide judicial security, apprehend federal fugitives, protect federal witness, transport and detain prisoners, manage seized and forfeited assets, and engage in various other missions that respond to the nation’s homeland security and emergency needs.

Drug Enforcement Administration.  H.R.1105 would provide $1.9 billion for programs, $51 million above the 2008 funding level, to fight illegal drug use.

Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms.  H.R.1105 would provide $1.1 billion, $43 million above the 2008 funding level, to investigate violent crime, arson, firearms trafficking, and crimes involving explosive.

Federal Bureau of Prisons. H.R.1105 would provide $6.2 billion, $561 million above the 2008 funding level, to address rising costs and overcrowded prisons. 

Adam Walsh and Child Exploitation.  H.R.1105 would provide $234 million to locate missing children, investigate child pornography and prostitution, and begin to track down the 100,000 registered sex offenders whose whereabouts are unknown. 

Interoperable Radios.  H.R.1105 would provide $185 million, $111 million above the 2008 funding level, to provide law enforcement officials with interoperable radio systems as recommended by the 9/11 Commission.

Science

H.R.1105 would fund:

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).  H.R.1105 would provide $17.8 billion to the NASA which is $380.4 million more than was appropriated in Fiscal Year 2008.  The National Aeronautics and Space Administration supports earth and climate change science, space exploration, and Space Shuttle operations.

National Science Foundation (NSF). H.R.1105 would provide $6.49 billion for the NSF which is $362 million more than was appropriated in Fiscal Year 2008.  The National Science Foundation is one of the primary sources for university and college based basic research.

Related Agencies

H.R.1105 would fund:

Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC).  The H.R.1105 would provide $344 million, $15 million above the 2008 funding level, to reduce the backlog of pending EEOC cases.

Legal Services Corporation.H.R.1105 would provide $390 million, $40 million above the 2008 funding level, for legal assistance to people who are unable to afford it.

Energy and Water Development

Division C of the Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would provide funding for renewable energy and energy efficiency, fossil and nuclear energy programs, water infrastructure, science, and nuclear nonproliferation.  In total, Division C would appropriate $33.3 billion, which is $2.37 billion more than was appropriated for the Fiscal Year 2008 and $2.1 billion more than President Bush’s Fiscal Year 2009 budget request. Major provisions of Division C include:

Army Corps of Engineers.  The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would provide $5.4 billion to Army Corps of Engineers ($2.1 billion for Construction and $2.2 billion for Operations and Maintenance) which in total is $184.7 million less was appropriated in Fiscal Year 2008.  These types of Army Corps of Engineers programs are responsible for the nation’s flood protection, navigable waters and ports, and coastal protection.

Bureau of Reclamation.  The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would appropriate $1.08 billion for the Bureau of Reclamation which is $32 million less than was appropriated in Fiscal Year 2008.  The Bureau of Reclamation is responsible for the nation’s water diversion, delivery and hydroelectric dams. 

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.  The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would provide $1.93 billion to the Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.  The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy manage the nation’s investment in research, development and deployment of renewable energy resources and energy conservation technologies and use.  The $1.93 billion provided by Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 for energy efficiency and renewable energy includes:

  • $273 million for advanced vehicle technology;
  • $217 million for biomass and biorefinery systems;
  • $200 million for the weatherization assistance program;
  • $175 million for solar energy research and development;
  • $168.9 million for hydrogen research and development;
  • $140 million for building technology;
  • $90 million for industrial activities;
  • $50 million for the State Energy Program;
  • $55 million for wind energy research and development;
  • $44 million for geothermal research and development; and
  • $40 million for water power energy research and development.

Innovative Technology Loan Guarantee Program.  The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would appropriate $465 million that would support $47 billion in loan guarantees as authorized by Title 17 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005.  The $47 billion in loan guarantees would be allocated as follows:

  • $18.5 billion for renewable energy and/or energy efficiency systems and manufacturing;
  • $18.5 billion for nuclear power facilities;
  • $6 billion for coal based power generation and industrial gasification activities at retrofitted and new facilities that incorporate carbon capture and sequestration or other beneficial uses of carbon;
  • $2 billion for advanced coal gasification; and
  • $2 billion for nuclear fuel cycle facilities;

Science.  The Department of Energy funds a series of advanced technology projects and climate change research.  These funds are important because according to the DOE it is the “single largest Federal government supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States.”  The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would provide $4.7 billion in total science funding ($754.9 million more than was appropriated in Fiscal Year 2008) which includes:

  • $1.57 billion for basic energy science;
  • $795.7 million for high energy physics;
  • $601.5 million for biological and environmental research;
  • $402.5 million for fusion research;
  • $177.9 million for climate change research; and
  • $15 million for the Advanced Research Projects Agency.

Fossil Energy.  The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would allocate $876 million (including $149 million transfer from Clean Coal Power Initiative) for fossil energy research and development which is $133 million more than was appropriated in Fiscal Year 2008.

Strategic Petroleum Reserve. The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would provide $205 million for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve which would reject the Bush Administration’s proposal to double the size of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve.

Financial Services and General Government

Division D of theOmnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would provide funding for key investments to improve government services for the American people, including improving services for taxpayers, community development, supporting small businesses, and strengthening the judicial system.  In total, Division D would appropriate $22.7 billion, which is $2 billion more than was appropriated for the Fiscal Year 2008 and $400 million more than President Bush’s Fiscal Year 2009 budget request. Major provisions of Division D include:

Consumer Protection and Regulatory Agencies. The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would provide increases for oversight and enforcement:

  • $105 million for the Consumer Product Safety Commission to keep unsafe products from the marketplace;
  • $943 million for the Securities and Exchange Commission to enhance enforcement, oversight, and investor protections;
  • $259.2 million for the Federal Trade Commission to protect consumers, including investigations into subprime lending, identity theft, and anti-competitive practices; and

·         $146 million for the Commodity Futures Trading Commission  to better protect futures markets and the customers who use them from fraud and abuse; and

  • $341.8 million for the Federal Communications Commission to continue to make available rapid, efficient, and worldwide communications services, promote fair competition, protect consumers, and educate the public on the nationwide transition to digital television scheduled for June 12, 2009.

Small Business Administration. The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would provide $110 million for Small Business Development Centers to provide free or low-cost management assistance to small businesses that are customized to local conditions and $22.5 million for small business microloans to provide loan subsidy and technical assistance to entrepreneurs.

Community Development Financial Institutions. The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would provide $107 million for economic development and low-cost financial services in underserved communities.

Financial Education. The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would provide $1.6 million for Treasury’s Office of Financial Education to help Americans make smart financial choices with initiatives in schools and efforts to combat predatory lending.

Election Reform. The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would provide $106 million for grants to help states ensure reliable, accurate, and accessible elections, including funding to help states meet the requirements of the Help America Vote Act ($100 million) and research into voting systems for voters with disabilities ($5 million).

Taxpayer Services and Oversight. The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would provide $2.3 billion to improve services for taxpayers, including funding for IRS pre-filing services ($38 million), IRS Taxpayer Advocate ($193 million), tax counseling for the elderly ($5.1 million), and low-income taxpayer clinics ($9.5 million). Inaddition,H.R.1105 would provide nearly $7 million to catch tax cheats through audits, collection efforts, and improved technology, and $230 million to improve IRS efficiency and accuracy by updating outdated computer systems.

National Security and the War on Drugs. The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would provide increased funding for Treasury’s Office of Terrorism and Financial Intelligence ($62 million); Financial Crimes Enforcement Network ($91.5 million); Office of National Drug Control Policy($439 million); High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas ($234 million); and Drug-free Communities Grants ($90 million).

District of Columbia. The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 includes funding to assist DC students ($109 million), support the DC Criminal Justice System ($540 million), and compensate the District government for security costs of national events including the Presidential Inauguration ($39 million).

Judicial Branch. The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 includes $6.5 billion to support the Judicial Branch, including funding for Defender Services ($849 million) and a cost of living adjustment for judges.

Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies

Division E of the Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would provide funding for drinking water and wastewater programs, clean-up of hazardous waste sites, climate change programs, programs for Native Americans, and funding to fight fires and protect America’s natural resources.  In total, Division E would appropriate $27.6 billion which is $1 billion more than was appropriated for the Fiscal Year 2008 and $1.78 billion more than President Bush’s Fiscal Year 2009 budget request. Major provisions of Division E include:

Bureau of Land Management.  The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would appropriate $1.03 billion for activities within the Bureau of Land Management which is $30.6 million more than was appropriated in Fiscal Year 2008.  The funding that would be provided to Bureau of Land Management would be used to support conservation and wildlife activities, energy management, and land resource management.

National Wildlife Refuge System.  The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would provide $462.8 million for the National Wildlife Refuge System which is $28.7 more than was appropriated in Fiscal Year 2008.  The National Wildlife Refuge System is charged with conserving the nation’s fish, wildlife, and flora.

National Parks. The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would provide $2.52 billion for the National Parks Service which is $135.1 million more than was appropriated in Fiscal Year 2008.  The legislation specifically includes a $160 million increase over Fiscal Year 2008 levels that would support improved park management and operation.

Wildland Fire Management.  The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would provide $2.99 billion ($2.13 billion through the Department of Agriculture and $859 million through the Department of Interior) which combined is $239 million more than was enacted in non-emergency spending in Fiscal Year 2008. 

Drinking Water and Wastewater.  The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would provide $1.52 billion ($829 million for the Drinking Water and $689 million for the Clean Water State Revolving Funds) which equals the amount appropriated in Fiscal Year 2008.  These two programs are used by county and municipal governments to improve their drinking water quality and wastewater treatment facilities.

Superfund.  The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would allocate $1.28 billion for the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act which is $31 million more than was appropriated in Fiscal Year 2008.  The funding that would be provided for the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act would be used for clean-up of the nation’s most polluted areas.

State and Tribal Assistance Grants.  The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would allocate $2.97 billion for State and Tribal Assistance Grants which is $42 million more than was appropriated in Fiscal Year 2008.  The programs within the State and Tribal Assistance Grant account support air quality improvements, beach protection, and efforts to protect water from non-point source pollution.

National Forest System.  The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would provide $1.51 billion for the National Forest System which is $40 million more than was appropriated in Fiscal Year 2008.  The funding for the National Forest System would be used to protect the nation’s wilderness and wildlife and support law enforcement activities within the National Forest System.

Indian Health Service and Bureau of Indian Affairs.  The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would provide $6 billion ($3.6 billion for the Indian Health Service and $2.4 billion for the Bureau of Indian Affairs) which combined is $319.7 million more than was appropriated in Fiscal Year 2008.  The increased funding would be used to improve the levels of health care, education, and housing in Indian country.

Climate Change.  The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would fund important programs needed to address global climate change such as the greenhouse gas registry ($6.5 million), renewable fuels standard implementation $8 million, and climate change research within the United States Geological Survey ($65 million).

Endangered Species Act.  The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would give the Secretaries of Interior and Commerce the ability to withdraw the final rule relating to "Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Special Rule for the Polar Bear.”

California Waiver.  The Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would require the Environmental Protection Agency to complete its reconsideration of the California Waiver by June 30, 2009.

Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies

Division F of the Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would provide funding for health care, research, job training, financial aid and other initiatives. In total, Division F would appropriate $152.3 billion in discretionary funding for the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, Education and related agencies. The amount is $7.4 billion above the Fiscal Year 2008 comparable level for these agencies and departments. Major provisions of Division F include:

Health and Human Services

H.R.1105 would fund:

Critical Medical Research.  The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is the primary federal agency for conducting and supporting medical research.   Composed of 27 Institutes and Centers, the NIH provides leadership and financial support to researchers in every state and throughout the world.  H.R.1105 would provide $30.3 billion to the NIH to fund research into diseases such as cancer, Alzheimer’s, and diabetes.   This funding level is $938 million above last year.

Health Promotion Programs. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provides numerous public health programs including those that promote healthy behaviors, prevent disease, and investigate health problems and prepare for emerging health threats. The legislation would provide $6.7 billion for the public health programs administered by the CDC at the federal, state and local levels. This amount is $239 million above last year.

Access to Health Care. H.R.1105 would provide $2.2 billion for the Community Health Centers program, which includes community health centers, migrant health centers, and health care centers for the homeless. These organizations provide primary health care and social services for those without other access to care. This funding level is $125 million above last year and will provide services to an additional 470,000 uninsured Americans.

Health Insurance for High Risk Individuals. Someindividuals are denied affordable health care coverage because of pre-existing medical conditions. Thirty-four states offer plans allowing high risk individuals the opportunity to buy into state-sponsored health insurance plans. H.R.1105 provides $75 million for state high risk insurance pools to provide affordable health insurance to nearly 200,000 individuals with high risk medical conditions. This funding level is $26 million above last year.

Outreach to Seniors Eligible for Medicare. Medicare was created in 1965 to provide health insurance for people age 65 and older and others. As the population ages, more seniors are becoming eligible for Medicare which already covers nearly 40 million Americans. H.R.1105 provides $45 million, an increase of $6 million above 2008, for outreach to seniors to help them understand which Medicare benefits are available to them.

Training for Health Professionals.  The legislation provides $842 million, $64 million above 2008, for Health Professions Training programs.  This funding will train doctors and other medical personnel providing improved access to critical health care services.  The Kaiser Family Foundation estimates that the nursing shortage facing the United States will grow to 340,000 in 2020.  Of the funding in H.R.1105, $171 million will fund nurse education programs, $15 million above 2008.  

Colorectal Cancer. H.R.1105 would create a new $25 million national program to provide colorectal cancer screening and diagnostic follow-up care. The Center for Disease Control estimates that if every American over age 50 were regularly screened, 60 percent of the 55,000 annual deaths from colorectal cancer could be prevented.

Autism. The bill would include full funding of the Combating Autism Act. H.R.1105 would provide $63.4 million for prevention of and support for families affected by autism and other related developmental disorders. This is an increase of $9.8 million over last year’s appropriation.

Head Start Services for More Young Children. Head Start, a highly-successful federal-to-local grant program established in 1965, provides early childhood education and services, including health, nutrition, and social and behavioral development for low-income, preschool children and their families. The program promotes readiness among America’s low-income children. H.R.1105 would provide $7.1 billion, $235 million more than 2008, to ensure that 900,000 low-income children have access to high quality preschool services.

Child Care Assistance to Help Parents Keep Working. Child care costs rise every year and affordable, quality child care is crucial for working parents. H.R.1105 provides $2.1 billion, $65 million above 2008, to support quality child care for 11,000 more children than last year.

Education

H.R.1105 would fund:

Assistance for Students with Disabilities.  The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) provides assistance to ensure that all children with disabilities have access to a free, appropriate public education.  H.R.1105 would provide $11.5 billion for IDEA Part B state grants, an increase of $558 million above 2008. 

Financial Assistance to Make College More Affordable for Millions of Students. Pell grants provide need-based financial assistance that helps low- and middle-income undergraduate students and their families pay for the costs of postsecondary education and vocational training. H.R.1105 would provide $17.3 billion in funding for the Pell Grant program, an increase of $3.1 billion above 2008. The maximum Pell Grant award established is $4,860, an increase of $619 over the 2008 level. These funds will assist 7 million students with the costs of higher education. The legislation will also assist 1.4 million students attend school with $1.9 billion in funding for federal supplemental educational opportunity grants, federal work study, Perkins Loans, and the Leveraging Educational Assistance Partnerships program.

Grants for Disadvantaged Students. Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act provides resources to local school districts to help disadvantaged students succeed academically.  H.R.1105 includes $14.5 billion — $593 million above 2008 – for Title I grants to school districts, and another $546 million – an increase of $54 million – for Title school improvements grants that are designated specifically to help turn around struggling schools.

Community Services Block Grants. The Community Services Block Grant (CSBG) program provides states, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, U.S. Territories, Indian Tribes and tribal organizations, community action agencies, migrant and seasonal farm workers or other organizations designated by the states, funds to alleviate the causes and conditions of poverty in communities. H.R.1105 provides $700 million, $46 million above 2008, for the CSBG program which serves an estimated 16 million individuals. The legislation also provides $1.7 billion for the Social Services Block Grant to help states support their most vulnerable with child care, protective services, services for the disabled, adoption, counseling, transportation, foster care, substance abuse, and congregate meals.

Afterschool Programs.  21st Century Community Learning Centers provide a safe and supervised environment for students before the school day begins and after it ends.  The legislation provides $1.1 billion to serve 1.7 million children.  These programs continue the learning experience for participating children by providing enriching opportunities while their parents are at work.  The bill includes a $50 million increase over the 2008 level.

Labor

H.R.1105 would fund:

Employment and Training Administration. H.R.1105 would provide $3.6 billion for training and employment services, $50.2 million above the 2008 funding level.  This amount includes $1.2 billion for dislocated worker employment and training state grants, $861 million for adult employment and training state grants, and $924 million for youth employment and training state grants.  Additional funds provide support for the YouthBuild program ($70 million) and other employment and training activities.

Community Service Employment for Older Americans.  H.R.1105 would provide $571 million for this program, which provides work-based training at community service organizations to help lower-income older Americans seeking to remain in or re-enter the workforce.

State Unemployment Insurance and Employment Service Operations.  H.R.1105 would provide $3.7 billion, which is $278 million above the 2008 funding level.  These funds support grants to states to administer state unemployment insurance programs and employment services operations, as well as related national activities.

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).  H.R.1105 would provide $513 million for OSHA, which is $27 million above the 2008 funding level, to rebuild the agency’s workplace enforcement capacity and increase the pace of its standard setting.  The bill would direct that $1 million of the appropriation be used for a recordkeeping enforcement initiative on worker injury and illness reporting.

Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA).  H.R.1105 would provide $347 million for MSHA, which is $15 million above the 2008 funding level.  The appropriation would better enable MSHA to implement the MINER Act and improve workplace health and safety of our nation’s miners. 

Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).  H.R.1105 would provide $597 million for BLS, which is $52.4 million above the 2008 funding level, to strengthen the agency’s ability to conduct the nation’s employment statistics programs.

Bureau of International Labor Affairs (ILAB). H.R.1105 would provide $86 million for ILAB, which is $5 million more than the 2008 funding level. These funds will enable ILAB to support programs designed to end abusive and exploitative child labor around the world, as well as expand programs to protect worker rights in countries with which the U.S. has trade preference programs.

Office of Job Corps. H.R.1105 would provide $1.7 billion, $73.4 million above the 2008 funding level, for Job Corps to provide at-risk youth with occupational and employment skills.

Veterans Employment and Training. H.R.1105 would provide $239 million, which is $11.3 million above the 2008 funding level, for this agency to work with the Departments of Housing and Urban Development and Veterans Affairs to address the needs of homeless veterans, including homelessness prevention.

Related Agencies

Social Security Administration. H.R.1105 includes $10.5 billion for the administrative expenses of the Social Security Administration (SSA).  This amount is $709 million more than last year’s level.  These funds will help address workload increases not assumed in the President’s budget; continue to support efforts to reduce excessive backlogs in disability workloads; and improve on other service delivery challenges.  Within these funds, an additional $240 million is provided for continuing disability reviews and redeterminations of eligibility, which, on average, save $10 in inappropriate payments for every $1 spent.

Legislative Branch

Division G of the Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would provide funding for the legislative branch of government, including the Government Accountability Office, the Congressional Budget Office, and the Library of Congress. In total, Division G would appropriate $4.4 billion which is $43 million more than was appropriated for the Fiscal Year 2008.

State, Foreign Operations, and Related Agencies

Division H oftheOmnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would make key investments to fight international terrorism, bolster diplomacy, strengthen global health initiatives, and fund vital humanitarian assistance programs around the world. It provides $36.6 billion in funding for Department of State operations, embassy security and foreign aid programs, as well as U.S. contributions to international organizations. This is $1.6 billion below the previous Administration’s proposed budget and $3.8 billion over enacted Fiscal Year 2008 non-emergency appropriations. Major provisions of Division H include:

State Department and USAID Operations, Staff, and Security. The billwould provide:

·         $4.2 billion for Diplomatic and Consular Programs to fund diplomatic operations and hire an estimated 500 additional positions to fill vacancies in the Foreign and Civil Service. This amount is $464 million above Fiscal Year 2008 levels.

·         $1.1 billion for Worldwide Security Protection for ongoing security protection for U.S. embassy personnel.

·         $808.6 million for operating expenses for USAID, to allow the agency to hire 300 additional Foreign Service Officers as part of the Development Leadership Initiative. This amount is $178 million above Fiscal Year 2008 levels.

Global Health.H.R.1105 would provide a total of $7.1 billion to strengthen the global public health infrastructure and surveillance network, including:

·         $5.5 billion for international HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment, and care programs, including $600 million for multilateral programs through the Global Fund to Fight HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.

·         $1.6 billion for Global Health and Child Survival programs, including increases of nearly $50 million for maternal and child health programs, $35 million to fight malaria, $11 million to combat tuberculosis and $82 million for international family planning.

Humanitarian Assistance. H.R.1105 would provide:

·         $971 million to help displaced people around the world with food, water, shelter and other basic needs, including humanitarian assistance for Gaza. This amount is $104 million above the Fiscal Year 2008 funding level, not including emergency appropriations.

·         $350 million for Disaster Assistance to avert famines and provide life-saving assistance during natural disasters and for internally displaced people in Iraq and around the world. This amount is $30 million above the Fiscal Year 2008 funding level, not including emergency appropriations.

Peacekeeping Activities. The bill would provide:

·         $1.5 billion for contributions for U.N. Peacekeeping activities to support peacekeeping missions around the world, including in Sudan, Liberia, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kosovo, and Lebanon.

·         $250.2 million for targeted peacekeeping operations, to advance international support for voluntary multinational peacekeeping and stabilization efforts, including support for international missions not supported by the U.N., but of particular interest of the United States.

Middle East Security Assistance. H.R.1105 would provide $2.38 billion for Israel (not including $170 million in emergency appropriations), $1.5 billion in economic and security assistance for Egypt, and $498.5 million in economic and security assistance for Jordan.

Other Key State and Foreign Operations Appropriations provided in the bill include:

  • $762 million for critical humanitarian, development, and peacekeeping programs in Sudan, including $414 million to support the U.N. Mission in Darfur;
  • $875 million for the Millennium Challenge Corporation, which is $321 million below the Fiscal Year 2008 level.
  • $875 million for International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement, which is $318.6 million above Fiscal Year 2008;
  • $405 million for the Merida Initiative for counternarcotics and law enforcement programs in Mexico and Central America (which is in addition to $465 million in assistance for these countries in the supplemental);
  • $424 million for clean energy and biodiversity programs worldwide, including funding for the Global Environmental Facility and international conservation programs to work with developing nations to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, preserve parks, and protect wildlife;
  • $700 million to support basic education around the world;
  • $300 million for programs to improve access to drinking water and sanitation programs;
  • $538 million for educational, cultural, and professional exchange programs worldwide, which is $37 million above Fiscal Year 2008;
  • $709 million for broadcasting programs critical to U.S. public diplomacy efforts, which is $40 million above Fiscal Year 2008;
  • $340 million for the Peace Corps, which is $9 million above Fiscal Year 2008; and
  • $116 million for the Democracy Fund, to promote democracy, including support for human rights, media, and the rule of law.

Transportation and Housing and Urban Development and Related Agencies

Division I of the Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would provide funding for road construction, mass transit, rail, airports, housing, and community and economic development.  Funding is also included for numerous safety-related programs. In total, Division E would appropriate $55 billion which is $6.18 billion more than was appropriated for the Fiscal Year 2008 and $4.37 billion than President Bush’s Fiscal Year 2009 budget request. Major provisions of Division I include:

Transportation

Federal Aviation Administration. H.R.1105 would provide a total of $15.39 billion for the Federal Aviation Administration ,which is $865 million more than was appropriated in Fiscal Year 2008.  Specifically, the legislation would allocate $9.04 billion for Federal Aviation Administration operations that would be used to improve safety and air traffic organization, and to boost hiring and training of air traffic controllers and aviation safety inspectors.

Federal-aid Highway Program.  H.R.1105 would allocate $40.7 billion for the program, which is $483.9 million more than was appropriated in Fiscal Year 2008.  The Highway Trust Fund supports highway safety and surface transportation projects throughout the country.

Amtrak. H.R.1105 would allocate $1.45 billion for the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak), which is $128.1 million more than was appropriated in Fiscal Year 2008.  Amtrakserves nearly 26 million riders annually at more than 500 stations in 46 States on approximately 22,000 route miles. 

Federal Transit Administration. H.R.1105 would fund the Federal Transit Administration at $10.1 billion, which is $773 million more than was appropriated in Fiscal Year 2008.  The funding provided to Federal Transit Administration would support improved bus facilities and light rail.

Housing and Urban Development

Public and Indian Housing. H.R.1105 would provide $16.8 billion for tenant-based rental assistance, which is $341 million above 2008 funding levels, to continue providing 1.9 million vouchers to individuals and families with homes and provide 14,000 new, targeted vouchers for disabled and homeless veterans to help them weather the housing crisis. Within this account, $75 million is allocated for Veterans Affairs housing.

Public Housing Capital Fund. H.R.1105 would provide $2.45 billion, $11 million above the 2008 funding level, for Public Housing Authorities to make critical repairs and improvements to public housing units and improve living conditions for residents.

Public Housing Operating Fund. H.R.1105 would provide $4.45 billion, $255 million above 2008 funding level, for maintenance, crime prevention, and energy costs at public housing units.

Revitalization of Severely Distressed Public Housing (HOPE VI). H.R.1105 would provide $120 million for HOPE VI, which is $20 million above 2008 funding level, for competitive grants to revitalize neighborhoods with deteriorating public housing projects, including demolition of public housing and construction of mixed-income housing.

Native American Housing Block Grants. H.R.1105 would provide $645 million for these grants, which is $15 million above the 2008 funding level. This program provides an allocation of funds on a formula basis to Indian tribes and their tribally-designated housing entities to help them address the housing needs within their communities. $3.5 million of this funding would be allocated for a national Native American housing organization to provide training and technical assistance to Indian Housing authorities and tribally designated housing entities as authorized by the Native American Housing Assistance and Self Determination Act.

Native Hawaiian Housing Block Grant. H.R.1105 would provide $10 million for these grants to State of Hawaiian Home Lands for housing and housing related assistance to development, maintain, and operate affordable housing for low-income Native Hawaiian families. 

Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA). H.R.1105 would provide $310 million for HOPWA, which is designed to provide states and localities with resources and incentives to devise long-term comprehensive strategies for meeting the housing needs of persons living with HIV/AIDS and their families.

Rural Housing and Economic Development. H.R.1105 would provide $26 million for this program, which is $9 million above the 2008 funding level. This office was established to ensure that the Department has a comprehensive approach to rural housing and rural economic development issues.  

Community Development Block Grants (CDBG). H.R.1105 would provide $3.9 billion, $34 million above the 2008 funding level, to fund community and economic development projects in 1,180 communities.

Brownfields Redevelopment. H.R.1105 would provide $10 million to provide competitive economic development grants to cities for the redevelopment of abandoned, idled, and underused industrial and commercial facilities where development is hindered by real or potential environmental contamination.

Home Investment Partnerships Program. H.R.1105 would provide $1.8 billion to provide assistance to state and local governments for the purpose of expanding the supply and affordability of housing to low- and very low-income people. Within this account, $65 million would be allocated for Housing Counseling Assistance, which is $50 million above the 2008 funding level.

Self-help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP).  H.R.1105 would provide $24 million for SHOP, which is $4 million above the 2008 funding level, toassist low-income homebuyers who are willing to contribute to the building of their houses.

Project-Based Rental Assistance. H.R.1105 would provide $7.1 billion, which is $668 million above the 2008 funding levels, to provide affordable housing to 1.3 million low-income families and individuals, most of which are elderly or disabled.

Homeless Assistance Grants.H.R.1105 would provide $1.7 billion, which is $91 million above the 2008 funding level, for these grants to break the cycle of homelessness and to move homeless persons and families into permanent housing by providing rental assistance, emergency shelter, transitional and permanent housing, and supportive services to homeless persons and families.

Housing for the Elderly. H.R.1105 would provide $765 million, which is $30 million above the 2008 funding level, to provide capital grants under Section 202 to eligible entities for the acquisition, rehabilitation, or construction of housing for low-income seniors.

Housing for the Disabled. H.R.1105 would provide $250 million, which is $13 million above the 2008 funding level, to provide capital grants under section 811 to eligible entities for the acquisition, rehabilitation, or construction of housing for persons with disabilities.

Federal Housing Administration (FHA). H.R.1105 would establish a $315 billion limitation on commitments to guarantee single-family loans during Fiscal Year 2009 within the Mutual Mortgage Insurance Program Account. This compares to the 2008 limitation of $185 billion and reflects the FHA’s dramatically increased market share in the wake of the national housing credit crises.

Government National Mortgage Association. H.R.1105 would establish a $300 billion limitation on new commitments in the Guarantees of Mortgage-back Securities Loan Guarantee Program Account. This association, also known as Ginnie Mae, guarantees privately issued securities backed by mortgages insured or guaranteed by FHA, the VA, or the Rural Housing Service.

Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity. H.R.1105 would provide $53.5 million for this program, which is $3.5 million above the 2008 funding level for this program.  The fair housing activities appropriation includes funding for the Fair Housing Assistance Program (FHAP), which provides prompt processing of title VIII complaints, and the Fair Housing Initiatives Program (FHIP), which is designed to alleviate housing discrimination by increasing support to public and private organizations.  

Related Agencies

Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation. H.R.1105 would provide $181 million for this account to counsel families in danger of losing their homes to foreclosure.

Department of Homeland Security and Other Matters

Division J of theOmnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 would provide further investments and provisions relating to the Department of Homeland Security for Fiscal Year 2009. Major provisions of Division J include:

United States Secret Service.  The bill would provide $100 million, designated as an emergency requirement, to address additional requirements related to the Service’s protection mission, including $61.5 million for protective missions and the hiring of 150 additional Special Agents; $23.8 million for the White House Communications Agency interoperable communications project; $12.7 million for necessary repairs and maintenance at the Service’s training center; and $2 million for training classes for expanded protective operations.

Authorization extensions for key DHS programs.  The bill would extend the authorization of the Basic Pilot (E-Verify) program, the EB-5 Visa program, and the National Flood Insurance Program through September 30, 2009.

Commission on the Prevention of Weapons of Mass Destruction Proliferation and Terrorism.  The bill would amend current law (Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission, P.L. 110-53) to provide for an extension of the Commission.  H.R.1105 would also make available $1.1 million in funding to the Commission from Fiscal Year 2009 Department of Defense Operation and Maintenance funds.

Legislative History

On February 23, 2009, Representative David Obey, Chairman of the House Committee on Appropriations, introduced the Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 (H.R.1105). On February 25, 2009, the House approved H.R.1105 by a 245-178 vote.

The Senate is expected to consider H.R.1105 (Calendar No. 26) the week of March 2, 2009.

Expected Amendments

Information on amendments will be distributed to DPC listserv recipients.

Administration Position

At the time of this writing, the Administration has not issued a Statement of Administration Position.

Resources

Congressional Research Service, FY2009 Status Table of Appropriations, available here.

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